Rug/Hydrangea

Alexander Vvedensky
Translated from the Russian by Matvei Yankelevich

I regret that I’m not a beastrunning along a blue path,telling myself to believeand my other self to wait a little,I’ll go out with myself to the forestto examine the insignificant leaves.I regret that I’m not a starrunning along the vault of the sky,in search of the perfect nestit finds itself and earth’s empty water,no one has ever heard of a star giving out a squeak,its purpose is to encourage the fish with its silence.And then there’s this grudge that I bear,that I’m not a rug, nor a hydrangea.I regret I’m not a rooffalling apart little by little,which the rain soaks and softens,whose death is not sudden.I don’t like the fact that I’m mortal,I regret that I am not perfect.Much much better, believe me,is a particle of day a unit of night.I regret that I’m not an eagleflying over peak after peakto whom comes to minda man observing the acres.I regret I am not an eagleflying over lengthy peaksto whom comes to minda man observing the acres.You and I, wind, will sit down togetheron this pebble of death.It’s a pity I’m not a chalice,I don’t like that I am not pity.I regret not being a grove,which arms itself with leaves.I find it hard to be with minutes,they have completely confused me.It really upsets me terriblythat I can be seen in reality.And then there’s this grudge that I bear,that I’m not a rug, nor a hydrangea.What scares me is that I movenot the way that do bugs that are beetlesor butterflies and baby strollersand not the way that do bugs that are spiders.What scares me is that I movevery unlike a worm,a worm burrows holes in the earthmaking small talk with her.Earth, where are things with you,says the cold worm to the earth,and the earth, governing those that have passed,perhaps keeps silent in reply,it knows that it’s all wrong.I find it hard to be with minutes,they have completely confused me.I’m frightened that I’m not the grass that is grass,I’m frightened that I’m not a candle.I’m frightened that I’m not the candle that is grass,to this I have answered,and the trees sway back and forth in an instant.I’m frightened by the fact that when my glancefalls upon two of the same thingI don’t notice that they are different,that each lives only once.I’m frightened by the fact that when my glancefalls upon two of the same thingI don’t see how hard they are tryingto resemble each other.I see the world askewand hear the whispers of muffled lyres,and having by their tips the letters graspedI lift up the word wardrobe,and now I put it in its place,it is the thick dough of substance.I don’t like the fact that I’m mortal,I regret that I am not perfect,much much better, believe me,is a particle of day a unit of night.And then there’s this grudge that I bearthat I’m not a rug, nor a hydrangea.I’ll go out with myself to the woodsfor the examination of insignificant leaves,I regret that upon these leavesI will not see the imperceptible words,which are called accident, which are called immortality, which are called a kind of roots.I regret that I’m not an eagleflying over peak after peakto whom came to minda man observing the acres.I’m frightened by the fact that everything becomes dilapidated,and in comparison I’m not a rarity.You and I, wind, will sit down togetheron this pebble of death.Like a candle the grass grows up all aroundand the trees sway back and forth in an instant.I regret that I am not a seed,I am frightened I’m not fertility.The worm crawls along behind us all,he carries monotony with him.I’m scared to be an uncertainty,I regret that I am not fire.1934 ***Мне жалко что я не зверь,бегающий по синей дорожке,говорящий себе поверь,а другому себе подожди немножко,мы выйдем с собой погулять в лесдля рассмотрения ничтожных листьев.Мне жалко что я не звезда,бегающая по небосводу,в поисках точного гнездаона находит себя и пустую земную воду,никто не слыхал чтобы звезда издавала скрип,её назначение ободрять собственным молчанием рыб.Ещё есть у меня претензия,что я не ковёр, не гортензия.Мне жалко что я не крыша,распадающаяся постепенно,которую дождь размачивает,у которой смерть не мгновенна.Мне не нравится что я смертен,мне жалко что я неточен.Многим многим лучше, поверьте,частица дня единица ночи.Мне жалко что я не орёл,перелетающий вершины и вершины,которому на ум взбрёлчеловек, наблюдающий аршины.Мне жалко что я не орёл,перелетающий длинные вершины,которому на ум взбрёлчеловек, наблюдающий аршины.Мы сядем с тобою ветерна этот камушек смерти.Мне жалко что я не чаша,мне не нравится что я не жалость.Мне жалко что я не роща,которая листьями вооружалась.Мне трудно что я с минутами,меня они страшно запутали.Мне невероятно обидночто меня по-настоящему видно.Ещё есть у меня претензия,что я не ковёр, не гортензия.Мне страшно что я двигаюсьне так как жуки жуки,как бабочки и коляскии как жуки пауки.Мне страшно что я двигаюсьнепохоже на червяка,червяк прорывает в земле норы,заводя с землёй разговоры.Земля где твои дела,говорит ей холодный червяк,а земля распоряжаясь покойниками,может быть в ответ молчит,она знает что всё не такМне трудно что я с минутами,они меня страшно запутали.Мне страшно что я не трава трава,мне страшно что я не свеча.Мне страшно что я не свеча трава,на это я отвечал,и мигом качаются дерева.Мне страшно что я при взглядена две одинаковые вещине замечаю что они различны,что каждая живёт однажды.Мне страшно что я при взглядена две одинаковые вещине вижу что они усердностараются быть похожими.Я вижу искажённый мир,я слышу шёпот заглушённых лир,и тут за кончик буквы взяв,я поднимаю слово шкаф,теперь я ставлю шкаф на место,он вещества крутое тестоМне не нравится что я смертен,мне жалко что я не точен,многим многим лучше, поверьте,частица дня единица ночиЕщё есть у меня претензия,что я не ковёр, не гортензия.Мы выйдем с собой погулять в лесдля рассмотрения ничтожных листьев,мне жалко что на этих листьяхя не увижу незаметных слов,называющихся случай, называющихся бессмертие, называющихся вид основ.Мне жалко что я не орёл,перелетающий вершины и вершины,которому на ум взбрёлчеловек, наблюдающий аршины.Мне страшно что всё приходит в ветхость,и я по сравнению с этим не редкость.Мы сядем с тобою ветерна этот камушек смерти.Кругом как свеча возрастает трава,и мигом качаются дерева.Мне жалко что я не семя,мне страшно что я не тучность.Червяк ползёт за всеми,он несёт однозвучность.Мне страшно что я неизвестность,мне жалко что я не огонь.

Feature Date

Series

Selected By

Share This Poem

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on email

Print This Poem

Share on print

Alexander Vvedensky (1904-1941) studied art and poetry under the Russian Futurists in Leningrad during the early nineteen-twenties, a liberal period of Soviet power. He banded together with Daniil Kharms and others to form various avant-garde groups dedicated to theater, poetry and general troublemaking, all of which culminated in the formation of the OBERIU (Union of Real Art) in 1928.

The OBERIU found itself increasingly attacked in the press and in late 1931, its key members were arrested on charges of being involved in an “anti-soviet group of children’s writers.” Vvedensky and Kharms spent several months in prison and were then exiled until the end of 1932. There would be no more OBERIU performances, and no hope of publication, except for sporadic poems and translations in magazines and books for children.

In the mid-thirties, Vvedensky left Leningrad for a quieter life in Kharkov. He died—or was killed—during the evacuation of the Ukraine in 1941. His poetry was not published in Russia until the period of glasnost. Much of Vvedensky’s work comes down to us from Kharms’s archives (a suitcase that, after Kharms’s arrest in 1941, was in the safe-keeping of their mutual friend, Iakov Druskin.) And, of course, some of his writings have been lost.

Matvei Yankelevich edited and translated Today I Wrote Nothing: The Selected Writings of Daniil Kharms (Ardis/Overlook), and is the co-translator (with Eugene Ostashevsky) of Alexander Vvedensky’s An Invitation for Me to Think (NYRB Poets), which received a National Translation Award. He is a founding member of the Ugly Duckling Presse editorial collective and has curated UDP’s Eastern European Poets Series since 2002. He teaches translation and book arts at Columbia University’s School of the Arts. His most recent book of poetry is Some Worlds for Dr. Vogt (Black Square). He has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the National Endowment for Humanities. 

Winner of the 2014 ALTA National Translation Award

"Vvedensky is a marvel: a poet too little known in Russia, and not known at all in the English-speaking world, is revealed as a major 20th-century world poet—wonderful, wonderfully strange, and haunting. The alchemical translation, with its shifty rhymes and non-rhymes, intense images and absent logic, knits and unknits reality before the reader’s eyes, walking not a line so much as a live wire."
—From the Judges Citation for the American Literary Translation Association’s National Translation Award for Poetry

"...it’s high time that more readers pick up on [Vvedensky’s] work to break language, to crush understanding so that what is beneath and beyond it can smuggle its miracle into our event-hemorrhaging lives."
Asymptote Journal

Poetry Daily Depends on You

With your support, we make reading the best contemporary poetry a treasured daily experience. Consider a contribution today.